NAM 1 Docket Ready -Attorney General

NAM 1 Docket Ready -Attorney General
Nana Appiah Mensah

 

 

Contrary to claims that the State cannot prosecute Nana Appiah Mensah, commonly called NAM 1, CEO of the defunct gold collectible company, Menzgold, Attorney General and Minister of Justice, Godfred Yeboah Dame has also revealed that dockets for financial crimes in the country are also almost ready for prosecution to start.

 

According to him, the delay is as a result of painstaking investigations which have conducted into these crimes to gather all the facts. Ghana recently experienced alleged financial crimes including the activities of the defunct gold dealership firm, Menzgold. The Executive Director of the Economic and Organised Crime Office

 

 

(EOCO), COP Maame Yaa Tiwaa Addo-Danquah was in the news recently over claims that the State was finding it difficult in gathering evidence against NAM1. But such claim was later refuted by the Asante Professional Club, the group that invited the anti graft czar who said the EOCO boss was misquoted in his submission and did not

 

 

say so. Another financial crime witnessed in the country was the banking crisis, leading to the Bank of Ghana (BoG) spending over GHC25billion to clean up the sector and formation of Consolidated Bank Ghana (CBG). The situation caused misery and distress to many homes and unleashed a social crisis as riots, demonstrations

 

 

broke out on the streets of Accra and other parts of the country. In real terms, people lost their homes, and some marriages have even broken up as a result of Menzgold saga. Indeed, one lawyer suggested that the story of Menzgold could cause a civil war in Ghana in a manner akin to the civil war in the Albania in the 1997 caused by

 

 

aggrieved customers of a Ponzi scheme. By the Grace of God, Ghana was saved from such a situation as a result of the prompt action taken by authorities at the helm of the financial system. I am also happy to state that after painstaking investigations, dockets on that financial crime are almost ready for prosecution to commence in

 

 

earnest. The Office of Attorney-General is prosecuting other high-profile cases involving the offences of wilfully causing financial loss to the State, stealing, corruption, fraud, procurement breaches and money laundering. These cases have as their sole object the principle of holding public officers to account and involve sums of over $850 million.